ESI Shareholders Approve Merger Agreement with MKS Instruments


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Electro Scientific Industries, Inc. announced that at a Special Meeting of Shareholders held earlier today, ESI shareholders voted to approve the previously announced definitive merger agreement with MKS Instruments, Inc.

Upon consummation of the transaction, ESI shareholders will receive $30.00 per share, in cash, for a total of approximately $1 billion. All necessary regulatory and shareholder approvals are now complete, and subject to the satisfaction of certain remaining customary closing conditions, the transaction is expected to close in early February 2019. Upon the closing of the transaction, trading of ESI’s shares on NASDAQ will cease.

About ESI, Inc.

ESI enables our customers to commercialize technology using precision laser processes. ESI’s solutions produce the industry’s highest quality and throughput and target the lowest total cost of ownership. ESI is headquartered in Portland, Oregon, with global operations and subsidiaries in Asia, Europe and North America.

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