Raytheon's F-35 Precision Landing System Can Be Set up Anywhere in Less Than 1.5 Hours


Reading time ( words)

A Raytheon Company team recently conducted a rapid set up demonstration of a land-based expeditionary version of its Joint Precision Approach and Landing System to a group of global military officials at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland. JPALS is a GPS-based precision landing system that guides aircraft to precision landings in all weather and surfaces conditions.

"The entire system was fully operational in 70 minutes on Day One and 50 minutes on Day Two," said Matt Gilligan, vice president at Raytheon's Intelligence, Information and Services business. "Raytheon is offering the U.S. and its allies fast and accurate precision landing systems that support operations from bare-base locations."

During the demonstration, military officials from all four services, as well as representatives from Japan, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, and Italy, watched multiple F-35Cs land on the same designated runway landing point every time over the course of six different approaches.

This was the second proof-of-concept event in 2019 showing how F-35s can use a reconfigured mobile version of JPALS to support landings in austere environments. 

About Raytheon

Raytheon Company, with 2018 sales of $27 billion and 67,000 employees, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity solutions. With a history of innovation spanning 97 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration, C5I™ products and services, sensing, effects and mission support for customers in more than 80 countries. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Requirements of Being a MIL-certified Shop

11/12/2019 | Barry Matties, I-Connect007
Barry Matties speaks with American Standard Circuits’ VP of Business Development David Lackey, who has nearly 40 years of experience producing PCBs for the mil/aero market. David talks about what it’s like being a MIL-certified shop and the stringent quality and reporting requirements that it entails.

How to Dismantle a Nuclear Bomb

10/01/2019 | Peter Dizikes, MIT News Office
How do weapons inspectors verify that a nuclear bomb has been dismantled? An unsettling answer is: They don’t, for the most part. When countries sign arms reduction pacts, they do not typically grant inspectors complete access to their nuclear technologies, for fear of giving away military secrets.

Extending Field of View in Advanced Imaging Systems

08/12/2019 | DARPA
The military relies on advanced imaging systems for a number of critical capabilities and applications – from Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) and situational awareness to weapon sights. These powerful systems enable defense users to capture and analyze visual data, providing key insights both on and off the battlefield.



Copyright © 2019 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.